+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

100% Guaranteed No Plagiarism
Please read all instructions carefully and ensure they are clear before placing a bid
Please use the rubrics as a guide to meet the criteria for the paperInstructions

Assignment Instructions:

Write a 4 – 5-page essay (not including cover and reference pages) that:

· Examines Army historical events involving irregular warfare. 
· Analyze the various ways in which the environment affected organizational readiness, morale, and Soldier/unit discipline and propose strategies that a Sergeant Major can employ to address these effects.

Please check out this cite for the assignment:

· THE U.S. ARMY AND IRREGULAR WARFARE, 1775–2007

https://history.army.mil/html/books/irregular_warfare/CMH_70-111-1.pdf

Important Note 1: Utilize doctrinal and historical examples to support your rationale.
Important Note 2: Please use the rubrics (attached) and the example APA paper_APA style, 6th Edition (attached), when writing the essay.
Important Note 3: Need a strong thesis statement in the last line of the opening paragraph and the first line in the conclusion.
Important Note 4: Paper must have at least four level one headings, including the Conclusion. Refer to Purdue Owl APA style, 6th Edition.
Important Note 5: Please make sure to have transitional sentences (see attached essay example).

Sources A (click link or google):

· American Civil-Military Relations: The Soldier and the State in a New Era, Chapter 11 (25 pages)

https://digital-commons.usnwc.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1519&context=nwc-review

· Extracts from U.S. Constitution (see below)

Reflection Questions to Consider While Reading Sources A:

What are some of the major issues with the civil-military political activities occurring in our democracy?
What is the linkage between military professionalism and civilian control in civil military relations?
What is the Role of the senior noncommissioned officer in the civil-military relationship?

Sources B (click link or google):

· ATP 6-22.5, A Leader’s Guide to Soldier Health and Fitness_2016: Read chapters 2, 7, & 8.

https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/atp6_22x5.pdf

· ADP 6-22, Army Leadership_2019: Read para 8-36 to para 8-44

https://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/DR_pubs/DR_a/pdf/web/ARN20039_ADP%206-22%20C1%20FINAL%20WEB.pdf

Reflection Questions to Consider While Reading Sources B:

1. How do you know when there is too much (or too little) stress in your organization?
2. What affect does a leader’s behavior have on unit resiliency?
3. How do leaders, training, and equipment help in reducing stress during an operation?
4. How do leaders influence the stress level or the group performance?

Sources C (click link or google):

· Leadership in Irregular Warfare. The Accidental Statesman: General Petraeus and the city of Mosul, Iraq (see attached-LIIW)

· Irregular Warfare (IW) Joint Operating Concept-2007

https://www.jcs.mil/Portals/36/Documents/Doctrine/concepts/joc_iw_v1.pdf?ver=2017-12-28-162020-260

· Doctrine for the Armed Forces of the United States JP 1

https://www.jcs.mil/Portals/36/Documents/Doctrine/pubs/jp1_ch1.pdf

· A Different ESSAY TITLE 2
Running head: ESSAY TITLE 1

Full Essay Title
Student Name
School
Class
Instructor
Date

Full Essay/Paper Title
This begins the introduction section of the essay. Indent the first line 0.5” and limit the introduction to 1-2 paragraphs. Double space throughout the document and place two spaces after sentences in the body of the paper. The last sentence of the introduction will be your thesis statement. This is your opinion or position on the topic of your essay (THESIS).

First Main Point
(USE THE TITLE OF YOUR POINT)

DO NOT USE the exact words “First Main Point” as Level I heading. Your main point or idea for the first section serves as the Level I heading. Use discussion and substantive evidence from the research for your first key point that supports your thesis. This section should contain multiple paragraphs and will likely be approximately 30% of the assigned length of the essay (@ 1.5 – 2 pages for a 5 – 8-page essay). End by using a transition sentence to introduce your second main point.

Second Main Point
(USE THE TITLE OF YOUR POINT)

DO NOT USE the exact words “Second Main Point” as Level I heading. Your main point or idea for the second section serves as the Level I heading. Use discussion and substantive evidence from the research for your second key point that supports your thesis. This section should contain multiple paragraphs and will likely be approximately 30% of the assigned length of the essay. End by using a transition sentence to introduce your third main point.

Third Main Point
(USE THE TITLE OF YOUR POINT)

DO NOT USE the exact words “Third Main Point” as Level I heading. Your main point or idea for the third section serves as the Level I head. Use discussion and substantive evidence from the research for your third key point that supports your thesis. This section should contain multiple paragraphs and will likely be approximately 30% of the assigned length of the essay. End by transitioning to your conclusion.

Conclusion

Restate the thesis statement (copy and paste) to remind readers of the controlling idea / position of your essay. Summarize each of your main points and illustrate the connection between your supporting evidence and your opinion (rationale, typically, five to seven complete sentences). Should End with a broad closing statement (big picture). I do not mind if the conclusion is 500 words.

References
Author, J. B. (2012). Book title
italicized
using sentence case. City Published, ST: Publishing Company.
Johnson, R. L. (n.d.). Webpage from a reputable and well-known organization website with no publication date. Retrieved from http://ncoes.army.mil/reputable_article_URL_to_article
Stewart, M. D. (2015, November 11). Article title from a published magazine in sentence case. Magazine Title Italicized, Vol#(Issue#), page #s the article appears.Form 1009W

Written Communication Assessment

Levels of Achievement

Criteria Failed Unsatisfactory Marginal Developing Proficient Exemplary

Introduction 0 Points

Missing
thesis.

2 Points

Weak thesis

4 Points

Thesis is not
focused or
relevant to
the writer’s
purpose.

6 Points

Thesis is
partially
focused or
relevant to
the writer’s
purpose.

8 Points

Thesis is
sufficiently
stated and
focused.

10 Points

Thesis is
clearly
stated,
focused, and
specific.

Development-
Research &
Support

0 Points

Major points
and
research do
not support
thesis.
Failed to
identify
relevant
sources.

2 Points

Major points
and research
offer weak
support for
thesis or are
poorly
developed.
Insufficient
source
materials
identified.

4 Points

Major points
and
research
partially
support
thesis.
Referenced
minimal
partially
relevant
sources.

6 Points

Major points
and
research
sufficiently
support
thesis.
Retrieved
sufficient
source
materials.

8 Points

Major points
and
research
fully support
thesis.
Identified a
variety of
relevant
sources.

10 Points

Major and
minor points
and research
fully support
thesis
throughout.
Identified and
critically
evaluated
relevant
sources.

Development-
Points of View

0 Points

Fails to
consider any
other points
of view.

2 Points

Mentions one
additional point
of view.

4 Points

Presents
other points
of view but
does not
reason
through
them.

6 Points

Presents
other points
of view and
partially
reasons
through
them.

8 Points

Discusses
multiple
points of
view.

10 Points

Thoroughly
introduces
and
discusses
multiple
points of
view.

Development-
Sequencing

0 Points

No rational
sequencing
of
major/minor
points.

2 Points

Sequencing of
major/minor
points
confuses
writer’s
purpose.

4 Points

Sequencing
of
major/minor
points
displays
weak
support for
writer’s
purpose.

6 Points

Sequencing
of
major/minor
points
partially
supports
writer’s
purpose.

8 Points

Sequencing
of
major/minor
points
effectively
supports
writer’s
purpose.

10 Points

Superb
sequencing
of
major/minor
points
thoroughly
supports
writer’s
purpose.

Development-
Analysis

0 Points

Fails to show
how
evidence
supports
main
points/thesis.

2 Points

Minimal
analysis to link
evidence to
main
points/thesis.

4 Points

Partial
analysis of
evidence to
show how it
supports
main
points/thesis.

6 Points

Some
analysis of
evidence to
show how it
supports
main
points/thesis.

8 Points

Clear
reasoning
that
sufficiently
ties
supporting
evidence to
main
points/thesis.

10 Points

Clear and
thorough
reasoning
that shows
how
evidence
supports
main
points/thesis.

Development-
Transitions/Flow

0 Points

No
transitions.

2 Points

Weak
transitions
throughout
disrupt flow.

4 Points

Several
transitions
are weak or
unclear.

6 Points

Transitions
a1

US ARMY SERGEANTS MAJOR ACADEMY
Master Leader Course

The Accidental Statesman: General Petraeus and the City of Mosul, Iraq



In late April 2003, Major General David Petraeus and the US Army’s 101
st

Airborne Division entered

the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, capital of Nineveh Province. It was less than a month since the start of

the US invasion of Iraq. But US troops had already captured Baghdad, dictator Saddam Hussein had fled

and, while security was still an overriding concern, the US military was no longer in full battle mode. In

Mosul, Petraeus quickly found himself confronting the question: What next?

The city of 1.7 million was a shambles as much from looting as from war. US Marines had just killed

17 Iraqis during a riot. The streets were in chaos, with police and other security forces nowhere to be seen.

The city had no electricity, running water or garbage removal. Shops were closed. Most public buildings

and factories lay in ruins. There was no administrative or economic infrastructure; ministries in

Baghdad which under Saddam had controlled all economic activity were now inoperative. Those who had

led the old Iraq had vanished: political leaders, judges, university faculty, teachers, factory managers,

ministry directors. The most senior of them were anyway suspect as members of the reviled former ruling

Baath, Party.

Addressing these deficiencies was hardly standard military business. But there was no one else to do

it. As Petraeus saw it, his task was to provide the building blocks for a new Iraqi society. How, the

general wondered, could he and his “Screaming Eagles” –as the division had been known since World

War II–reestablish conditions for normal daily life and help create the norms of a democratic society?

Whom could he trust? What was most urgent? What message should he give his troops? What was the

trade-offs between security and building bridges to the local population?

Petraeus found himself arbitrating a dizzying array of questions: How could he involve Iraqis in the

rebuilding? Should there be elections? If so, who should stand? Could some Baath Party officials retain

their jobs? If so, which ones? How and who should pay the thousands of unemployed civil servants?

What about controlling inflation? Should border crossings reopen for trade? How could he re-start the

university, open banks, and foster the creation of new businesses? What about the media? Underlying

these operational dilemmas lay a deeper uncertainty: could Petraeus establish himself as a leader whose

decisions were not only appropriate–but whose style would command the respect of a society not his

own?

Run-up to Mosul

When the 101
st

Airborne first crossed into Iraq from Kuwait on Friday, March 21, 2003, Petraeus had

not known that the division would be sent to Mosul. In fact, the entire short war, like its lead-up, had been

one of continual adaptation to cha

  
error: Content is protected !!