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Assignment and Instructions attached. Please use APA citations and References. Respond to 2 colleagues 1 paragraph each ColleagueRespond to at least two of your colleagues – try to select someone whose results differ from your own. Your responses should include, at a minimum, the following, based on what you have learned from the activity:
· A summary of what you think the implications are, based on the comparisons that your colleague made.
· An explanation of why there are differences in results, and any steps that can be taken to address the implications of these differences
Perhaps you have a sibling who remembers shared childhood experiences very differently from how you recall them. It can seem surprising that two people who grew up in the same family could have such different perspectives. Or, consider another setting—that of a traffic accident. When police officers arrive and take information from witnesses, the multiple accounts can be quite different. One witness may claim that the vehicle ran through a red stoplight, whereas another witness feels certain that the light was still green. These situations, in which people perceive the same event very differently, happen frequently. Every person has a unique view of the environment, and people make sense of the world in different ways.

This happens in business settings as well. These different perspectives can result from various factors, such as having diverse roles in a company, or having different backgrounds or training. Think about how you have reacted in situations when this has occurred and whether it has made you question your own perspective.

As you review Senge’s chapter on “Mental Models” and the class notes “A Brief Note on the Theory of Constraints” (located in this week’s resources), think about constraints that you may experience in your daily life.

This week’s Shared Practice is slightly different from what you are used to in this course. You will participate in a Card Deck Activity that is designed to have you consider the impact of focus on decision making.
Then, by Day 7 you will return to the Shared Practice forum and read through the posts and respond to two or more of your colleagues.

These are my Results:

Day 2 looking at the Card Deck my results are:

2- Spade
6 Club
K Spade
5 Diamond
9 Heart
A Spade
6 Spade
K Diamond
10 Diamond
3 Heart
7 Heart
J Heart
1st Colleague to respond to:
Round 1
1. 2 diamond
2. 6 club
3. King of spade
4. 3 diamond
5. 9 heart
6. Ace of spade
7. 6 spade
8. King of diamond
9. 10 diamond
10. 3 spade
11. 7 heart
12. Queen of heart
13. 8 spade
14. 6 diamond
15. nothing

2nd Colleague to respond to:
I only received 14 cards, but I believed between cards 4 and 6 is where I missed one.
1. 2 of Diamonds, 2. 6 of Clubs, 3. King of Spades, 4, 5 of Diamonds, 5. Could not identify 6. Could not identify, 7. Ace of Hearts, 8. 6 of Spades, 9. King of Diamonds, 10. 10 of Diamonds, 11. 3 of Spades, 12. 7 of Hearts, 13. Queen of Hearts, 14. 8 of Spades, 15. 6 of Hearts17
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ř
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2
ze 412

In the long run, the only sustainable
source of competitive advantage is
your organization’s ability to learn
faster than its competition.

Founder and Director of the Center
for Organizational Learning at MIT’s
Sloan School of Management, which
boasts such members as Intel, Ford,
Herman Miller, and Harley Davidson,
author Peter M. Senge has found a means
of creating a “learning organization.” In
THE FIFTH DISCIPLINE, he draws
the blueprints for an organization where
people expand their capacity to create
the results they truly desire, where new
and expansive patterns of thinking are
nurtured, where collective aspiration is set
free, and where people are continually
learning how to learn together. THE
FIFTH DISCIPLINE fuses these features
into a coherent body of theory and
practice, making the whole of an
organization more effective than the sum
of its parts.

Company after company, from Intel to
AT&T to Procter & Gamble to Coopers
have
adopted
the
and
Lybrand,
disciplines of the learning organization to
rid
themselves
of
learning
the
“disabilities”

C

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ON B

A

C

K

F

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A

P

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THE

FIFTH DISCIPLINE
THE ART AND PRACTICE OF THE LEARNING ORGANIZATION

ze 412

Peter M. Senge
C U R R E N C Y

D O U B I E D A Y

New York London Toronto Sydney Auckland

17. září 2004

ze 412

HD58.9.S46 1994

658.4-dc20

ISBN 0-385-26095-4 Copyright ©
by Peter M. Senge

90-2991 CIP

TO DIANE
For more information on Currency Doubleday’s new ideas on business, please write:
Currency Doubleday 1540 Broadway—Eighteenth Floor
New York, New York 10036
A CURRENCY PAPERBACK PUBLISHED BY DOUBLEDAY
a division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1540
Broadway, New York, New York 10036
CURRENCY and DOUBLEDAY are trademarks of Doubleday,
a division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc.

The Fifth Discipline was originally published in hardcover by Currency Doubleday, a division of Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc., in 1990. BOOK DESIGN BY RICHARD ORIOLO
Permission to reprint Navajo sand painting given by the
Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, Santa Fe, New Mexico, Photography by Kay V. Weist. The Library of Congress has cataloged the Currency hardcover edition as follows:
Senge, Peter M. The fifth discipline: the art and practice of
the learning organization/Peter M. Senge. — 1st ed.
p. cm.
“A Currency book”—T.p. verso. 1. Organizational effectiveness.
2. Work groups. I. Title. II. Title: Learning organization.
Introduction to the Paperback Edition and Some Tips for First-Time Readers copyright © 1994 by Peter M. Senge
All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America
17. září 2004

CONTENTS

Introduction to the Paperback Edition
Some Tips for First-Time Readers

ix xxi

  
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